What Do the Current Turmoils Have To Do With Us?

by Peter Herman, June 2020

Here we go again. Once more, another Black man is killed by a policeman in full view of cameras. Who knows how many more such killings and countless indignities occur hidden from view? Even mass shootings where many youths and even small children have been killed do not seem to bring about sane policies. What we do know is that each horrible incident has been followed by heartfelt protests, yet nothing much changes. Can we expect anything better in a society where a large segment tolerates an Offender in Chief, two Supreme Court justices with dodgy histories, namely Thomas and Cavanaugh, and a craven Congress?

Though we of the North American Man/Boy Love Association have many reasons to distrust the police, this is not an exercise in piling on but one of examining systemic conditions that lead to predictable outrages like the killing of George Floyd by police -- or the far less noted May 14th vigilante assassination on his doorstep of registrant Mattieo Condoluci in Omaha by a stranger who found his name, address, and photograph on a law-enforcement website. Of course, not all members of a community’s police are cut of the same cloth, but all are exposed to the general societal biases, and participate in the same systems of injustice and institutionalized violence.

Ironically, certain classes of people are seen simultaneously as weak and dangerous. Because they are weak, abuse can be heaped on them without much consequence. Because they are seen as dangerous, consciences are salved. This was the case for Jews under Nazism and is still too much the case for African Americans today.

Those of us who love boys too are seen as simultaneously weak and dangerous. “Sexually violent predators” is the label put on individuals who would never hurt a fly but are feared because they yearn for the mutually desired embrace of man and boy. Some among us have come up with the label “kind” to counter the hideous label, but kindness is too easily equated with weakness.

“White privilege” is a key concept that has risen to the top of public discussion in the wake of George Floyd's murder. Late-night host Jimmy Kimmel ably explained it recently. Those who are white and hard working, he said, may not feel particularly privileged. What that loses sight of however is that if you are white you never face the indignities of having store clerks watch you suspiciously as you shop or being refused the use of a bathroom in an emergency or having the police called if you are in the wrong neighborhood or even being shot at when knocking on a door for help.

Those who have an innate love for boys and are white (heaven protect those with the double jeopardy of also being Black) may not be immediately visible, but in a different way are denied much of “white privilege” and are ideally positioned to understand Black anger.

If you have an exclusive yearning to be close to boys, that aspect of your personality must be constantly checked and hidden at all costs from family and friends. You constantly must pretend to be who you are not. You hear of essentially life sentences for “crimes” that were once not crimes or whose definitions keep changing. You hear of those who have been falsely convicted because, once they dared “come out”, any social associations with youngsters was seen as “they must have done something”. You hear of thought crimes where police will scrutinize every frame of legal nudist videos for a single frame interpretable as lewd and lascivious. You hear of individuals who, despite what they feel are unreasonable laws, would never break them. And yet police will exploit yearnings for forbidden love in despicable entrapment schemes.

In his book, The End of Policing, professor of sociology Alex Vitale writes "Whole segments of our society have been deemed always-already guilty." He could be talking about boy-lovers as much as Black men. "This is not justice; it is oppression. Real justice would look to restore people and communities, to rebuild trust and social cohesion, to offer people a way forward...."

We who love boys do not riot or hurt members of the police. For this we are easily exploitable and ideal scapegoats. We are “kind.”


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